Distracted Driving

Distracted driving includes taking your eyes off the road; taking your hands off the steering wheel or letting your mind wander off your primary task of driving.

Performing non-driving activities while behind the wheel puts you at risk of causing an accident. Most people have cellphones or other electronic devices, and using these while driving can pose a serious safety threat. We strongly encourage you to always drive distraction-free, making the roads a safer place. Unfortunately, not everyone does this, and many injuries and deaths happen because of someone’s reckless driving.

At GKT, we have represented thousands of auto accident victims and we specialize in distracted driving cases. If you or your loved one has been killed or injured because of someone else’s distracted driving, contact us as soon as possible so we can help. It’s easy, it’s free and it’s worth it.

Don’t give up your rights!

Don’t sign anything or release any personal records before you talk to an attorney. Call us at 1-800-388-2529 or click the link for your FREE Consultation.

Types of distracted driving cases we handle:

  • Texting
  • Using a cellphone or smartphone
  • Using a navigation/GPS system
  • Reading, including directions and maps
  • Using the radio, CD or mp3 player
  • Eating, drinking or smoking
  • Unsecured pets
  • Performing personal hygiene and grooming
  • Talking to and interacting with passengers

Distracted Driving FAQs

What is distracted driving?

Distracted driving is caused by actions that take a driver’s attention away from safely operating a vehicle. That includes taking your eyes off the road; taking your hands off the steering wheel or letting your mind wander off your primary task of driving. Performing non-driving activities while behind the wheel puts you at risk of causing an accident.

What are some common distractions and non-driving activities?

  • Texting
  • Using a cellphone or smartphone
  • Using a navigation/GPS system
  • Reading, including directions and maps
  • Using the radio, CD or mp3 player
  • Eating, drinking or smoking
  • Unsecured pets
  • Performing personal hygiene and grooming
  • Talking to and interacting with passengers

Can I receive compensation for my injury that was caused by distracted driving?

Depending on your case, you could be compensated for financial damages like medical bills, lost wages and property damage. You may also collect other damages, including pain and suffering, humiliation and distress.

Do specific distracted driving laws exist?

Yes, but they vary by state and are primarily related to texting and cellphone use. There are two categories of laws: primary law and secondary law. With primary law, an officer may ticket an offender for a distracted driving violation without any other traffic offense. With secondary law, an officer may only ticket an offender for distracted driving if the driver has been pulled over for another traffic offense like speeding. Below are the current distracted driving laws:

 

Ohio – Bans on both texting and handheld device use as a primary law

Pennsylvania – Ban on texting as a primary law

West Virginia – Ban on both texting and handheld device use as a primary law

What types of accidents are caused by distracted driving?

Distracted driving can cause single-vehicle crashes, multi-vehicle crashes, truck or motorcycle crashes, and even involve pedestrians. They are caused by negligent drivers and are proven to be easily prevented.

The insurance company asked me to provide a statement about my accident. What should I do?

It depends on who is asking. Don’t sign or say anything to an insurance adjuster before you speak to an attorney. It could limit your rights to pursue a claim and significantly affect its value. If you are asked to provide a statement, contact GKT to help determine if you should consent.It’s a good idea to see a doctor if you think you’ve been injured. If you submit a claim to the insurance company without knowing the full extent of your damages, including injuries, you could experience financial hardship. Once a case is settled, you can’t reopen it and obtain additional compensation for your injuries.